Welcome to Surf Life Saving Sunshine Coast

Australia is known for its hot sunny days which make the beach even more enjoyable. However, the hot sun means there is increased exposure to the heat and the suns rays (UV rays). Lifeguards and lifesavers treat dehydrated persons almost every day during summer and getting sun burnt is far too common, which may have serious immediate results and later on in life.

WHY IS GETTING SUNBURNT BAD?

Ongoing over-exposure to the sun without proper protection can have immediate results such as soreness of your skin, becoming too hot and feeling sick. A common long term result is skin cancer. In fact, Australia has the highest per person rate of skin cancer (melanomas) in the world!

WHAT IS DEHYDRATION?

The heat created by the sun can affect you in a number of ways. It can cause your body temperature to rise and lose fluids by sweating. If you are not mindful of this you can become dehydrated, which essentially means you become too hot and do not have enough fluids in your body. Headaches and fatigue are common symptoms of dehydration.

IF YOU’RE SWIMMING AT THE BEACH AND FIND YOURSELF BEING TAKEN AWAY FROM THE BEACH AND UNABLE TO GET BACK, IT IS MORE THAN LIKELY YOU ARE CAUGHT IN A RIP CURRENT.

YOU CAN SURVIVE RIP CURRENTS BY KNOWING YOUR OPTIONS:

THE BEST ADVICE IS TO AVOID RIP CURRENTS ALTOGETHER. TO REDUCE THE LIKELIHOOD OF GETTING CAUGHT IN A RIP CURRENT, YOU NEED TO:

  • To reduce the chances of being caught in a rip current, always swim between the red and yellow flags
  • If you need help, stay calm, float and raise an arm to attract attention.
  • To escape a rip, swim parallel to the beach.
  • Always conserve your energy; the waves can assist you back to the beach.

AVOIDING RIP CURRENTS

  • Always swim between the red and yellow flags;
  • Observe all safety signs;
  • Obey all instructions from the surf lifesavers and lifeguards;
  • Understand what a rip current is;
  • Know how to spot rip currents and look for the common signs such as deeper, darker water and fewer breaking waves; and
  • Do not swim in or near a rip current.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT HTTP://WWW.RIPCURRENTS.COM.AU/